Learning Objectives & OverviewCourse Syllabus | LH's Virtual Office

Business Ethics: Concepts & Cases: Chapter 7 Outline
The Ethics Job Discrimination

Introduction

Mend it don't end it. (Bill Clinton 1995 ) {5th edition}

End Preferential Treatment (Pete Wilson) {5th edition}

Michigan {6th edition}

7.1 Job Discrimination: Its Nature

Forms of Discrimination: Intentional and Institutional Aspects

FORMS OF DISCRIMINATION
Intentional
Unintentional
Isolated

a single individual deliberately discriminates on the basis of personal prejudices.

a single individual unwittingly discriminates due to their unthinking acceptance of prevalent practices, stereotypes and attitudes.
Institutional

routine behavior of an institutionalized group deliberately discriminates on the basis of the prejudices of the group

routine behavior of an institutionalized group unwittingly discriminates due to institutionalized practice, stereotypes, attitudes, or corporate culture

7.2 Discrimination: Its Extent

Average Income Comparisons

Lowest Income Comparisons

Desirable Occupation Comparisons

Overall Summary

7.3 Discrimination: Utility, Rights, and Justice

Utility

Rights

Justice

Discriminatory Practices

Sexual Harassment

Beyond Race and Sex: Other Groups

6.4 Affirmative Action

Affirmative Action as Compensation

Affirmative Action as an Instrument for Achieving Utilitarian Goals and Equal Justice

Implementing Affirmative Action and Managing Diversity

Comparable Pay for Jobs of Comparable Worth

Conclusion

Cases for Discussion

ABC News: Should Kroger Pay Now for What Ralph's Employee Did Then?

Questions for Discussion

  1. Assuming that the store and district managers of Ralphs received complaints about Misiolek;s behavior starting in 1985, but that these complaints did not reach Ralphs' headquarters in Compton, do you believe that the judge is right in holding that the company as a whole should not be held responsible for his actions?  Should the company be held responsible for policies that prevent complaints from reaching headquarters?
  2. What sort of penalty do you believe would be appropriate for Ralphs?  In your view, was the $33.3 million penalty excessive?  Explain.
  3. Should Kroger have to pay for events that happened before it took over the chain of supermarkets?  
  4. Many states (but not California) adopt federal rules that place a cap of $300,000 on punitive damages in harassment cases.  Is such a cap a good idea from an ethical point of view?  Explain.
  5. What can a company do to make sure that a situation like Misiolek's does not occur?  Why do you think Ralphs allowed Misiolek to continue managing stores?
  6. What other issues do you believe this case raises or what else to you think it shows?

Wall Mart's Women

  1. What financial impact do you think the lawsuit could potentially have on Wal-Mart?
  2. What are the major moral complaints of the women suing Wal-Mart?  Do you believe these moral complaints are justified?  Why?
  3. What factors do you think might account for the discrepancies the Drogin report uncovered?
  4. What, if anything, do you think Wal-Mart should do to correct these discrepancies?  Should the company institute an "affirmative action" promotion program for female employees?  If so, what should this program be like?
  5. Do you think the women deserve to win their lawsuit?  Why or why not?
  6. What other issues do you believe this case raises or what else to you think it shows?


Learning Objectives & Overview | Course Syllabus | LH's Virtual Office